Talks and Workshops

I enjoy giving talks and workshops on Data Analytics. Here is a list of some of the talks I’ve given. In my Mathematics master I regularly gave talks on technical topics, and previously I worked as a Tutor and Technician in a School in Northern Ireland. I consider the evangelism of data and analytics to… Continue reading Talks and Workshops

Talk: Can Probabilistic Programming be applied to Rugby?

Yesterday evening I gave a talk at the Data Science Meetup in Luxembourg. This is part of my preparation for the talk at PyData the Python conference for Data Enthusiasts in Berlin. A few remarks – my slides from last night are here in IPython notebook format. I used for the presentation the excellent RISE… Continue reading Talk: Can Probabilistic Programming be applied to Rugby?

On Academic talks

On Academic talks

Cosma Shalizi, has an excellent talk on Academic talks.

I suggest one reads it.

I merely quote my favourite part:

  1. The point of the talk is not to please you, by reminding yourself of what a badass you are, but to tell your audience something useful and interesting. (Note to graduate students: It is important that you internalize that you are, in fact, a badass, but it is also important that then you move on. Needing to have your ego stroked by random academics listening to talks is a sign that you have not yet reached this stage.) Unless something matters to your actual message, it really doesn’t belong in the main body of the talk.
  2. You can stick an arbitrary amount of detail in the “I’m glad you asked that” slides, which go after the one which says “Thank you for your attention! Any questions?”.
  3. You also can and should put all these details in your paper, and the people who really care, to whom it really matters, will go read your paper. Once again, think of an academic talk as an extended oral abstract.

Internalise that you are in fact a bad ass. I wish more Professors gave advice like that.